A motorized dynamic stander.

date: 03/01/2002
author: Gudjonsdottir B, Mercer VS.
publication: Pediatr Phys Ther. 2002 Spring;14(1):49-51.
pubmed_ID: 17053681

PURPOSE: The purpose of this clinical suggestion is to describe a new type of a stander, a dynamic stander. KEY POINTS: The dynamic stander may give children with severe cerebral palsy an opportunity for movement in lower extremities and trunk while they are standing. It may increase their tolerance for standing in a stander for a considerable period of time. In addition, the potential for increased bone mineral density might be greater with a dynamic stander than a conventional stander. The design, development, and initial clinical use of the new type of stander is described. SUMMARY: Some minor problems related to the design of the dynamic stander were noted. Design changes to correct these problems could be easily implemented before the introduction of the stander for more widespread clinical use.

Effects of a dynamic versus a static prone stander on bone material density and behavior in four children with severe cerebral palsy.

date: 03/01/2002
author: Gudjonsdottir, Bjorg MS/PT, Vicki Stemmons Mercer, PhD, PT
publication: Pediatric Physical Therapy 2002;14:38-46.
pubmed_ID: 17053680

PURPOSE: in this case series, we examined how two types of prone standers affected bone material density and behavioral variables in four children of preschool age with severe cerebral palsy. METHODS: In phase one, four children of preschool age participated in an eight-week standing program, standing for 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Two children stood in a conventional stander, and two stood in a new type of motorized (dynamic) stander that provides intermittent weight bearing. Measurements of bone material density before and after the program revealed increases in bone material density in both children who used a dynamic stander and one child who used a static stander. In phase two, all four subjects stood in both types of stander during three separate test sessions. RESULT: Measures of behavioral variables, including behavioral state, reactivity, goal directedness, and attention span, indicated little or no effect of type of stander on behavior. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest there is potential value in additional research concerning the effects of static and dynamic standers on bone material density and behavior in children with cerebral palsy.

Technical note–a patient propelled variable-inclination prone stander.

date: 12/01/1983
author: Motloch WM, Brearley MN.
publication: Prosthet Orthot Int. 1983 Dec;7(3):176-7.
pubmed_ID: 6647014

A self-propelled mobile standing device is described with the facility of patient-operated inclination of the support platform, enabling objects on the floor to be reached. The device is provided with a removable tray at the level of the occupant’s chest.

The vertical wheeler: a device for ambulation in cerebral palsy.

date: 10/01/1985
author: Manley MT, Gurtowski J.
publication: Arch Phys Med Rehabilitation. 1985 Oct;66(10):717-20.
pubmed_ID: 4051716
Outside_URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4051716
The vertical wheeler is a new mobility aid that was specifically designed to help improve the quality of life for the handicapped child by providing mobility while standing. Results of a clinical trial in a population of patients with cerebral palsy are presented. Criteria were selected to allow evaluation of the rehabilitative effect of the device on the population. Results showed that the children in this cerebral palsy group all benefited from ambulation with the wheeler. Patients with spastic quadriparesis seemed to gain the most immediate benefit. The device contributed to improved mobility, posture, and self-image. The wheeler was safe and fun for the children. It has the potential for improving the psychologic and medical status of the child with severe locomotion impairment.