Effects of a standing table on work productivity and posture in an adult with developmental disabilities.

date: 1997;9(1):13-20. doi
author: Nelson D.
publication: Work
PubMed ID:24441921

Abstract

The standing table is an assistive device designed to encourage occupational performance of the upper extremities while helping the person compensate for limitations in standing posture. We conducted three single-subject studies of a standing table used by a 52-year-old man with spastic cerebral palsy and mental retardation. In the first study, positioning in the standing table resulted in no discernible difference in work output per hour in comparison to his customary seated posture. In the second study, positioning in the standing table resulted in an unexpectedly small increase in work output in comparison to his customary method of standing without special support at the work bench. In the third study, we demonstrated that the standing table dramatically improved the erectness of his posture as measured by an infrared motion detector in comparison to his customary method of standing. Because work productivity depends on multiple factors, improved posture and biomechanical stability do no always result in a proportionate improvement in work output. There remain multiple justifications of equipment such as the standing table in work settings for adults with developmental disabilities.

Effects of a standing table on work productivity and posture in an adult with developmental disabilities.

date:1997;9(1):13-20.
author: Nelson DL1, Schau EM1.
publication: Work
pubmed_ID: 24441921

 

Abstract

The standing table is an assistive device designed to encourage occupational performance of the upper extremities while helping the person compensate for limitations in standing posture. We conducted three single-subject studies of a standing table used by a 52-year-old man with spastic cerebral palsy and mental retardation. In the first study, positioning in the standing table resulted in no discernible difference in work output per hour in comparison to his customary seated posture. In the second study, positioning in the standing table resulted in an unexpectedly small increase in work output in comparison to his customary method of standing without special support at the work bench. In the third study, we demonstrated that the standing table dramatically improved the erectness of his posture as measured by an infrared motion detector in comparison to his customary method of standing. Because work productivity depends on multiple factors, improved posture and biomechanical stability do no always result in a proportionate improvement in work output. There remain multiple justifications of equipment such as the standing table in work settings for adults with developmental disabilities

The effect of positioning on the hand function of boys with cerebral palsy.

date: 1989 Aug;43(8):507-12.
author: Noronha J1, Bundy A, Groll J.
publication: Am J Occup Ther.
pubmed_ID: 2774051

 

Abstract

The effect of positioning (sitting and prone standing) on the hand function of 10 boys (mean age = 12.5 years, SD = 1.2 years) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy was studied. Two groups of subjects were tested twice (Tests 1 and 2) with the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (Jebsen, Taylor, Treischmann, Trotter, & Howard, 1969; Taylor, Sand, & Jebsen, 1973) to measure rate of manipulation. In addition, a scale modified from Hohlstein (1982) was used to measure quality of grasp on each subtest of the Jebsen-Taylor test. No significant differences between the mean scores of the two groups were found on the total scores of the Jebsen-Taylor test, either between Tests 1 and 2 or between sitting and prone standing. When the data from Tests 1 and 2 were combined, it was found that on one subtest–simulated feeding–the subjects performed significantly faster while in a prone standing position. On another subtest–picking up small objects–the subjects performed significantly faster while in a sitting position. Except during the simulated feeding subtest, the quality of the subjects’ grasp was observed to be mature and tailored to the objects manipulated. This paper presents considerations for analyzing positioning in relation to upper extremity tasks.

Mobility status and bone density in cerebral palsy

date: 1996 Aug;75(2):164-5
author: Wilmshurst S1, Ward K, Adams JE, Langton CM, Mughal MZ.
publication: Arch Dis Child.
pubmed_ID:8869203

 

Abstract

The spinal bone mineral density (SBMD) and calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) was measured in 27 children with cerebral palsy. They were categorised into four mobility groups: mobile with an abnormal gait, mobile with assistance, non-mobile but weight bearing, non-mobile or weight bearing. Mean SD scores for BUA and SBMD differed among mobility groups (analysis of variance, p < 0.001 and p = 0.078, respectively).

Vibration treatment in cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled pilot study.

date: 2010 Mar;10(1):77-83.
author: Ruck J1, Chabot G, Rauch F.
publication: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact.
pubmed_ID:20190383

Abstract

In this 6-month trial, twenty children with cerebral palsy (age 6.2 to 12.3 years; 6 girls) were randomized to either continue their school physiotherapy program unchanged or to receive 9 minutes of side-alternating whole-body vibration (WBV; Vibraflex Home Edition II, Orthometrix Inc) per school day in addition to their school physiotherapy program. Patients who had received vibration therapy increased the average walking speed in the 10 m walk test by a median of 0.18 ms(-1) (from a baseline of 0.47 ms(-1)), whereas there was no change in the control group (P=0.03 for the group difference in walking speed change). No significant group differences were detected for changes in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the lumbar spine, but at the distal femoral diaphysis aBMD increased in controls and decreased in the WBV group (P=0.03 for the group difference in aBMD change). About 1% of the WBV treatment sessions were interrupted because the child complained of fatigue or pain. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study appears to be safe in children with cerebral palsy and may improve mobility function but we did not detect a positive treatment effect on bone

A randomised controlled trial of standing programme on bone mineral density in non-ambulant children with cerebral palsy.

date: 2004 Feb;89(2):131-5
author: Caulton J.
publication:Arch Dis Child.
pubmed_ID: 14736627

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Severely disabled children with cerebral palsy (CP) are prone to low trauma fractures, which are associated with reduced bone mineral density.

AIMS:

To determine whether participation in 50% longer periods of standing (in either upright or semi-prone standing frames) would lead to an increase in the vertebral and proximal tibial volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (vTBMD) of non-ambulant children with CP.

METHODS:

A heterogeneous group of 26 pre-pubertal children with CP (14 boys, 12 girls; age 4.3-10.8 years) participated in this randomised controlled trial. Subjects were matched into pairs using baseline vertebral vTBMD standard deviation scores. Children within the pairs were randomly allocated to either intervention (50% increase in the regular standing duration) or control (no increase in the regular standing duration) groups. Pre- and post-trial vertebral and proximal tibial vTBMD was measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT).

RESULTS:

The median standing duration was 80.5% (9.5-102%) and 140.6% (108.7-152.2%) of the baseline standing duration in the control group and intervention group respectively. The mean vertebral vTBMD in the intervention group showed an increase of 8.16 mg/cm3 representing a 6% mean increase in vertebral vTBMD. No change was observed in the mean proximal tibial vTBMD.

CONCLUSION:

A longer period of standing in non-ambulant children with CP improves vertebral but not proximal tibial vTBMD. Such an intervention might reduce the risk of vertebral fractures but is unlikely to reduce the risk of lower limb fractures in children with CP.

Trochanteric girdle to prevent hip dislocation in standing. Suggestion from the field

date: 1988 Feb;68(2):226-7.
author:Ruys EC1.
publication: Phys Ther
pubmed_ID:3340662

Excerpt

This article describes the use of a trochanteric girdle on a child with acetabular dysplasia to prevent hip displacement during weight-bearing. The patient was a boy 12 years of age with hypotonic athetosis and such severe acetabular dysplasia that his hips dislocated laterally with the slightest adduction beyond neutral. The patient’s hips subluxated proximally with weight-bearing or joint compression with only 20 degrees of abduction.

Whole-body vibration training compared with resistance training: effect on spasticity, muscle strength and motor performance in adults with cerebral palsy.

date: 2006 Sep;38(5):302-8.
author: Ahlborg L1, Andersson C, Julin P.
publication: J Rehabil Med.
pubmed_ID: 16931460

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on spasticity, muscle strength and motor performance after 8 weeks of whole-body vibration training compared with resistance training in adults with cerebral palsy.

METHODS:

Fourteen persons with spastic diplegia (21-41 years) were randomized to intervention with either whole-body vibration training (n=7) or resistance training (n=7). Pre- and post-training measures of spasticity using the modified Ashworth scale, muscle strength using isokinetic dynamometry, walking ability using Six-Minute Walk Test, balance using Timed Up and Go test and gross motor performance using Gross Motor Function Measure were performed.

RESULTS:

Spasticity decreased in knee extensors in the whole-body vibration group. Muscle strength increased in the resistance training group at the velocity 30 degrees /s and in both groups at 90 degrees /s. Six-Minute Walk Test and Timed Up and Go test did not change significantly. Gross Motor Function Measure increased in the whole-body vibration group.

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest that an 8-week intervention of whole-body vibration training or resistance training can increase muscle strength, without negative effect on spasticity, in adults with cerebral palsy.

Effect of a new physiotherapy concept on bone mineral density, muscle force and gross motor function in children with bilateral cerebral palsy.

date: 2010 Jun;10(2):151-8
author: Stark C.
publication: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact.
pubmed_ID: 20516632

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a new physiotherapy concept on bone density, muscle force and motor function in bilateral spastic cerebral palsy children.

METHODS:

In a retrospective data analysis 78 children were analysed. The concept included whole body vibration, physiotherapy, resistance training and treadmill training. The concept is structured in two in-patient stays and two periods of three months home-based vibration training. Outcome measures were dual-energy x-ray absorption (DXA), Leonardo Tilt Table and a modified Gross Motor Function Measure before and after six months of training.

RESULTS:

Percent changes were highly significant for bone mineral density, -content, muscle mass and significant for angle of verticalisation, muscle force and modified Gross Motor Function Measure after six months training.

CONCLUSIONS:

The new physiotherapy concept had a significant effect on bone mineral density, muscle force and gross motor function in bilateral spastic cerebral palsy children. This implicates an amelioration in all International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health levels. The study serves as a basis for future research on evidence based paediatric physiotherapy taking into account developmental implications.

Characteristics of children with hip displacement in cerebral palsy.

date: 2007 Oct 26;8:101
author: Hägglund G1, Lauge-Pedersen H, Wagner P.
publication:BMC Musculoskelet Disord.

pubmed_ID: 17963501

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hip dislocation in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a common and severe problem. The dislocation can be avoided, by screening and preventive treatment of children with hips at risk. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of children with CP who develop hip displacement, in order to optimise a hip surveillance programme.

METHODS:

In a total population of children with CP a standardised clinical and radiological follow-up of the hips was carried out as a part of a hip prevention programme. The present study is based on 212 children followed until 9-16 years of age.

RESULTS:

Of the 212 children, 38 (18%) developed displacement with Migration Percentage (MP) >40% and further 19 (9%) MP between 33 and 39%. Mean age at first registration of hip displacement was 4 years, but some hips showed MP > 40% already at two years of age. The passive range of hip motion at the time of first registration of hip displacement did not differ significantly from the findings in hips without displacement. The risk of hip displacement varied according to CP-subtype, from 0% in children with pure ataxia to 79% in children with spastic tetraplegia. The risk of displacement (MP > 40%) was directly related to the level of gross motor function, classified according to the gross motor function classification system, GMFCS, from 0% in children in GMFCS level I to 64% in GMFCS level V.

CONCLUSION:

Hip displacement in CP often occurs already at 2-3 years of age. Range of motion is a poor indicator of hips at risk. Thus early identification and early radiographic examination of children at risk is of great importance. The risk of hip displacement varies according to both CP-subtype and GMFCS. It is sometimes not possible to determine subtype before 4 years of age, and at present several definitions and classification systems are used. GMFCS is valid and reliable from 2 years of age, and it is internationally accepted. We recommend a hip surveillance programme for children with CP with radiographic examinations based on the child‘s age and GMFCS level.